Archaeogaming

Archaeogaming: The Book (what’s in it, and how to pre-order)

Archaeogaming is now available for pre-order.

I wrote a book and somehow somebody wanted to publish it: Archaeogaming: An Introduction to Archaeology in (and of) Video Games will ship on May 2018 from anthropology and social sciences publisher Berghahn Books (New York/Oxford), and it’s available for pre-order in both library binding and paperback (ebook to follow). 240(!) pages, 22 illustrations:

Hardcover ISBN  978-1-78533-872-4 $120.00/£85.00
Paperback ISBN  978-1-78533-873-1 $34.95/£24.50

So what’s in it? Here’s an expanded Table of Contents:

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgements
Chapter 1. Introduction
What is Archaeogaming?
How is Archaeogaming Archaeology?
Archaeogaming, Media Studies, and Media Archaeology
Archaeogaming and Game Studies
Archaeologists as Game-Makers
Chapter Summaries
Chapter 2. Real-World Archaeogaming
Exhuming Atari
The Artifacts of Digital Fiction
Gaming Spaces
When Video Games Change
Chronologies and Typologies
A Blended Historical Reality: Pokémon Go
Chapter 3. Playing as Archaeologists
You Play an Archaeologist
Archaeologist Non-Player Characters
Public Reception of Archaeology
Archaeological Reception in Hearthstone
Looting
Looting and Ethics: Elder Scrolls Online
Chapter 4. Video Games as Archaeological Sites
How is a Video Game an Archaeological Site?
Landscape Archaeology in Video Games
Dwelling in Synthetic Worlds and Landscapes
Archaeogaming Tools and Method
Video Game Ethnoarchaeology
Archaeogaming Case Study: The No Man’s Sky Archaeological Survey
Glitches as Artifacts
Garbology in Video Games
Other In-Game Archaeologies
Chapter 5. Material Culture of the Immaterial
Introduction
Material Memory in Video Games
Video Game Museums and Museums in Video Games
Virtual Artifacts and their Real-World Manifestation
Experimental Archaeology
Lore and Lore Communities
Lore Realized: Video Game Cosplay
Archaeological Re-Creations
Chapter 6. Conclusion
Appendix. No Man’s Sky Archaeological Survey (NMSAS) Code of Ethics
(co-authored with Catherine Flick and L. Meghan Dennis)
Works Cited
Games Cited
Glossary
Index

I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it. I think it provides a good foundation for the various threads of video game archaeology, and hope that it becomes a launching pad for readers who want to take things further, grounding their work in critical theory and serious (and seriously fun) play.

PLEASE SUGGEST THIS TITLE TO YOUR LIBRARIAN!

Speaking with librarian Urag gro-Shub in the Arcaneum (Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim)

—Andrew Reinhard, Archaeogaming